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Transition Year

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Transition Year Subjects and Modules

Age Action Age Action is a charity which promotes positive ageing and better policies and services for older people. Working with, and on behalf of, older people they aim to make Ireland the best place in the world in which to grow older.

Volunteer names were gathered mid May in form class, after programme was explained at assembly to students and to parents at parent night.

All those interested(Names attached) will be divided into of 8-10 and on a rotation basis will work one to one with older learners for 5 weeks, 2hours per week (Friday 11-1) on the school premises.(O3)
Patsy hopefully will supervise or myself if I’m free.

Training (40 min session)will be given to a group of 8-10 students prior to starting date of Friday Sept 13th.
This first session will run up to and including the 11thOct.
Following this a new group of students and a new group of learners will repeat the above process.

Applied Maths Applied maths involves using maths to solve real life problems. It is an excellent leaving certificate subject to opt for particularly if you enjoy maths as it complements your core mathematics course and also the physics course. Students are often frightened of taking this subject as they think it is too difficult or harder than higher maths but those students that opt for Applied maths generally do much better in it in comparison to other subjects.
In fact, in 2014, Applied Maths had the highest percentage of As of any curricular subject, with 28.2% of Higher Level and a massive 41.6% of Ordinary Level Students getting As. This is generally the trend throughout the years.The TY module being offered to students will give them a flavour of what is involved in Applied Maths for Leaving cert. It is a half year module and is timetabled twice a week.
Students will engage in activities designed to help them develop as mathematicians working with their peers to help them develop their skills of
systemic mathematic enquiry
visualising
representing
modelling
Exploring and noticing structure
Mathematic enquiry and conjecture.
There will be a day trip involved where students will partake in outdoor maths activities
Assessment: Continuous Informal assessment – students will keep a folder where all their class work will be kept and assessed at the end of the module. Notes will be taken on students’ involvement when working in groups also.
More information will be added soon.
Archives The objective will be to scan, photos, documents, articles, slides, and various media belonging to the school ( and perhaps former schools that amalgamated to form Mount Temple). To collate and record this media with the possibility of creating a website to display relevant material.
Students will learn skills such as photography, digital editing, scanning techniques, file management, web design, archive skills, teamwork and collaboration.
Biology The TY Biology program involves a selection of material picked from Classification, Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, Microbiology and Human Biology.
Book club Over the course of the year, every TY student will take part in the Book Club rotational 6 week module. It is a module designed to foster independent reading and to forge oral analytical skills in a group setting. The module meets for a double period weekly. The teacher leads an analysis of “Foster” by Claire Keegan, consolidating the learning outcomes of JCT English in the first part of the class and then students complete independent reading in the school’s library for final 40 minutes. The wide selection of genres are promoted in this module together with the benefits of the escapism and social aspect of reading literature.
Book to Film Book to Film is a module in transition year whereby the students study similarities and differences between the written text and visual text.We choose as a group a book adapted to film.We read extracts from the book and watch the film version.Subsequently,we explore the cinematic techniques,key moments,character and plot development and themes.The students pick their favourite quotes from the book and film.
Book to Film Here is a short description of Book to Film studies:
Read the book and watch the movie version and analyse the similarities and differences between the written text and the visual text.

Students cover 4-5 texts during the module.Students also learn film terms and techniques and how to identify them.They also learn memorable quotes from both the book and film.
Students complete an assignment at the end of the module where they explore one of the texts in detail.

Business Students complete a project called ‘My Ideal Business’, describing the ideal business they would like to set up or work for. Topics covered include enterprise, recruitment, marketing, business ownership structures, insurance, employment legislation and consumer legislation.
Chemistry The Chemistry module aims
• To improve on skills developed at Junior Certificate
• To give students an appreciation of the practical value of chemistry
• To encourage development of problem solving skills
• To improve ability of students to use more advanced laboratory equipment
• To encourage students to work independently
After the module students should be able to:
• Design their own experiments, based on previous experience and knowledge acquired during TY module
• Work independently, demonstrating skills of observation, recording, analysis and interpretation
• Work efficiently, neatly and with safety and discipline.
Drama Practical, workshop based module on drama.
Economics Students will study both micro and macro economics and investigate how we make the best possible use of scarce resources in order to satisfy the requirements of as many people as possible. They will gain appreciation of the wider issues that affect business. It is suitable for all students whether or not they have studied business beforehand.
Engineering The module focuses on building up some of the basic marking out and bench-working skills through an initial single piece project, before moving on to more collaborative design based projects. These are students driven and may incorporate cross-curricular and year projects links. The final project will require research, design and prototyping, usually linking with a recycling/environmental theme, and building upon the previous learned practical skills.
English Firstly, the English Department hopes that Ty English will be a fun and rewarding year for all students. We want you to experience the joy of reading for pleasure. We want to help you find your voice as a writer, and to hone your skills as a communicator.
Secondly, this year is intended as atransitionbetween Junior Cert English and Leaving Cert English. The course is the foundation for Leaving Cert work and will prepare students for the very different demands of the Leaving Certificate course. If a student does not engage with Transition Year English, they may not have the skills required to take Higher Level English in the future.
Much of the work in Transition Year will be examined by continuous assessment so it is vital that students continue to apply themselves to their English classes, and do the assigned homework well while engaging with the many new and different experiences TY offers them.
There will be a focus on grammar and other writing conventions in the first term. This will help students to prepare for the literacy demands of the Leaving Certificate.
Students do an Author project during TY, based on at least three texts by one author. They must start their planning and reading for this project in the first term in order to do a good job. We suggest that TY students have a novel in their bag at all times.
The main assessment tasks inTransition Year are
Oral Presentation 20% of Final Grade
Author Project 40% of Final Grade
Leaving Cert Poetry 20% of Final Grade
The summer exam 20% of Final Grade There is also aLiteracy Examwhich will be held in December. The purpose of this exam is to check that students have the literacy to cope with the demands of the Leaving Certificate exam.

Students have a textbook,Rubicon, which they will be asked to bring to class daily. Students are asked to do their assignments; their planning; and to keep their notes; in a hardback copy which can be handed up to the teacher for periodic assessment.

What will you be doing in TY?

Teachers will do many different tasks and activities with their classes, and bring their own talents and interests to the table, so this list is not exhaustive, but gives an overview of some of the work that will be done in class.

FromSeptember to Christmasstudents will be studying:
12 Angry Men-play
Grammar and mechanics in writing
Public Speaking
FromJanuary to Easter, TY classes will be:
reading novels
studying literary criticism
Writing the Author Project (Students will be given support and time in class to work on this project.)
In thefinal term,students will be studying the work of a Leaving Certificate poet in preparation for the following year, and part of the summer exam will involve a Leaving Cert style question on this poet.
Students must include a bibliography or otherwise credit all sources for any written work during this year. Plagiarism will be severely dealt with, and will mean that you will fail the task.

A Summary of the Author Project:
At least three plays/novels by one author
Minimum of 10 typed A4 pages (12 font, single spacing)
Introduction, conclusion, index, bibliography
Research on life of the author etc
Information on the texts selected
Body of work must involve the student’s personal response to the work

English Author Project (Basic guidelines)

Students are expected to write a project on three texts by one author. Your project should demonstrate yourpersonal response and insightsto the author and their work. The texts chosen should present an appropriate level of challenge to each student. The project offers you an opportunity to mature as readers and, in many cases, to rediscover the joy of reading for pleasure.

Overview: summary is easy, analysis is hard. That’s why students summarise. But summary gains no marks, only thoughts do. Students should question every paragraph they write: is this saying something? Or is it just obvious, banal stuff that will tell the reader what he or she already knows, or could easily find out for themselves with a quick google?

Remember what made for a good oral presentation in 2nd year:
(1) controlled, considered use of material, (not too little, not too much);
(2) imaginative shaping of this material, to serve the clear purpose stated at the outset;
(3) a clear, lively tone of voice, body language that’s relaxed and an overall attitude that says, ‘I’m committed, I’m engaged’.

The written version of these skills will ensure a successful author project:
(1) controlled, considered use of references, (not too little, not too much);
(2) imaginative shaping of these references, to serve the clear overall focus stated at the outset;
(3) a correct, lively (and checked!) writing style, and an overall attitude that says, ‘I’m committed, I’m engaged’.
Presentation:use a scrapbook or a folder to present your work.
Visual impact: paste in some pictures of the book covers or anything related to the novels. Use colour and make your project visually appealing.

Introduction:
Explain why you chose this author.
Give alittlebackground information on the author – her life and career. Do NOT copy and paste a detailed biography; just pick out the points that you find interesting and relevant.

Write ashortsummary of each novel you have read. ( A couple of paragraphs maximum, a very brief outline.)

Explain what you liked about each novel. You might refer to:

Characters
Language and dialogue
Your favourite scenes Have these books been made into films?
What do you think of the film compared to the book?
Compare the two novels. Look at similarities and differences.
What themes does the author deal with in their books?
Conclusion:
What is your final thought on the author? Would you read more of their books?
Would you recommend their work to other readers? Why? Why not?

Submission date: to be confirmed.
Assessment:the grade for the project will form a substantial percentage of students’ summer grade in English. (To be confirmed, but usually 30%+.)

Environmental Awareness This covers a range of environmental issues such as Climate a Change, Pollinator Decline, Food Waste and Pollution.
European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) In Transition Year in Mount Temple we offer a year module for ECDL. ECDL is a computer literacy certification which is globally recognised.
Students with ICT skills will enjoy an enriched educational experience and will be better prepared for life, work and further learning.
The cost of the ECDL course in school is €150. This comprises of an online learning account, 7 module tests and 7 mock tests. In school the students have 2 hours (3 periods) of class time. However, students need to be prepared to give at least another 2 hours a week at home also to this course.
Film Studies You will learn about: The visual language of cinema/cinematography/film shots and angles/colour/composition etc. How ‘other worlds’ are depicted in three different films -Films that you might not see outside of this class…films that are different from the ones you are normally exposed to, how all the different elements of a film come together to create meaning and make an impact on the audience The role of the director and how their vision shapes the experience ,The film’s social context Indepth, close analysis of key scenes or moments from a film; how our perception changes on a second viewing
Film Study Module in Film Studies – some aims and objectives
You will learn about:
The visual language of cinema/cinematography/film shots and angles/colour/composition etc.
How ‘other worlds’ are depicted in three different films
Films that you might not see outside of this class…films that are different from the ones you are normally exposed to
How all the different elements of a film come together to create meaning and make an impact on the audience
The role of the director and how their vision shapes the experience
The film’s social context
Indepth, close analysis of key scenes or moments from a film; how our perception changes on a second viewing
Film Study (French) “Entre les murs” – “The Class” by Laurent Cantet
Aim :
The aim of this module is to increase student’s awareness of the French culture and language and to immerse them in authentic situations using a French film.
Learners will develop five language skills: reading, listening, writing, spoken production and spoken interaction.
Objectives:
Students will:
• be able to express an opinion on a film
• learn vocabulary of education and school
• write and present auto portrait
• discuss school rules
• compare schooling in France and in Ireland
• discuss good/bad students and teachers
• learn some words in “Verlan”
Methodologies: Research, project work, review, survey, role play.
French Film screening “Entre les murs”
Aim :
The aim of this module is to increase student’s awareness of the French culture and language and to immerse them in authentic situations using a French film.
Learners will develop five language skills: reading, listening, writing, spoken production and spoken interaction.
Objectives:
Students will:
∙ be able to express an opinion on a film
∙ learn vocabulary of education and school
∙ write and present auto portrait
∙ discuss school rules
∙ compare schooling in France and in Ireland
∙ discuss good/bad students and teachers
∙ write and present orally self-portrait
Language elements:
∙ Present tense
Past tense (Passé Composé)
Adjectives
Pronoun « on »
∙ Comparison
∙ Conditional: je voudrais / j’aimerais

Methodologies:
Individual / pair and group work
Research, project work – poster, review- letter, survey, oral presentation.
Written and oral activities based on IFI Study Guide.
Assessment:
Students will:
Write Code of Behaviour /poster
Give written opinion about the film / letter
Talk about what they like and dislike / oral presentation
Compare school system in France and in Ireland / reading comprehension – written production – chart

Games This is a module designed to engage students in activities outside of ‘the norm’ and outside of our junior cycle PE programme in MT. Local facilities/ instructors are sourced in an attempt to ignite new interests/ experiences and encourage lifelong physical activity among our students. Activities include TRX, kickboxing, self-defence, pitch & putt, fencing, sailing, water sports, climbing. Some of these activities are facilitated on-site while others are easily accessed by foot or via public transport. Hikes around Howth Head, foot golf, jumpzone are other typical activities for the Games group; again, to encourage physical activity through many different forms, easily accessible in the locality.
Games Games is a module designed to engage students in activities outside of ‘the norm’ and outside of our junior cycle PE programme in MT.
Local facilities/ instructors are sourced in an attempt to ignite new interests/ experiences and encourage lifelong physical activity among our students.
Activities include TRX, kickboxing, self-defence, pitch & putt, fencing, sailing, water sports, climbing.
Some of these activities are facilitated on-site while others are easily accessed by foot or via public transport.
There is a cost incurred to cover instructors fees, but this is kept at a minimal school discount rate (usually €25-€30 for a 6 week block).
Hikes around Howth Head, foot golf, jumpzone are other typical activities for the Games group; again, to encourage physical activity through many different forms, easily accessible in the locality.
Organising Teacher: E. Ryan (PE Department)
Geography Modules are open to change from year to year but the following are aspects of the course
that the Geography Department deem important with the TY Programme
 Global Development and Development Education
 Cultural Studies, Migration and the Impact on Society
 Locational Geography
 Geography Skills
 Climate Change and Sustainability

Student Aims for TY:
 To promote the conservation and sustained management of the earth’s resources
for the welfare and happiness of its inhabitants and for future generations.
 To recognize and be sensitive to other people and their culture
 To develop a variety of geographical skills which can be applied to the world of work
and to many other aspects of life.
 To encourage the use of I.C.T. in the teaching and learning of geography
 To provide students through their study of geography with an interesting and
enjoyable experience and imbue in them a lifelong love of their natural and cultural
environment
 To promote a sensitive awareness of environment
 To encourage in students a sensitive awareness of peoples, places and landscapes,
both in their own country and elsewhere.
 To contribute to students’ understanding of important issues and problems in
contemporary society.
 To provide opportunities to foster and build upon students’ natural curiosity about
their own and other people’s social and physical environments
 To bridge the transition between Junior and Senior Cycle and to support students to
become more independent in their learning. To support the development of key
learning and thinking

Guidance GUIDANCE:
The Guidance module in TY allows students to investigate future careers and college courses which may be of interest. The students will complete a number of exercises such as interest and personality inventories. The module largely follows the format in the Reach+ programme. Students can also explore the area of Subject Choice which will be important in selecting subjects for 5th Year. The Reach+ College and Preparation Programme encourages students to match their aptitude, values, interests and personality to career pathways and course opportunities. This programme includes an online learning environment where students can complete and store all of their career research. This module covers the areas of Career Planning, Self Assessment, World of Work, World of Education and a Career Investigation. Students are encouraged to engage in a wide variety of activities and research designed to prepare them for the transition from secondary school to work or college.
History (Mr. MacNamara’s class) Mr MacNamara’s Class: Europe and the Wider World 1850 to 1918. Topics covered include: Monarchies & Republics, The Great Powers, Imperialism & the ‘Scramble for Africa’, Suffragettes & Suffragists, WW1.
History (Ms. Doyle and Ms. Ní Shíomóin’s classes) Ms. Doyle & Ms. Ní Shíomóin’s classes: The class do a course to introduce them to genealogy with an emphasis on developing their research skills. Students visit Glasnevin Cemetery Museum and are assigned to group projects that involve researching the genealogy of selected individuals. They will use this research to create a wider historical profile of the individual and the time in which they lived. This will be tied into the decade of centenaries. They will learn to use census records, birth records, military archives etc to glean information on their chosen individual. This research will be delivered collectively in class by each group in the form of an oral presentation. Students will send their findings back to Glasnevin and can choose to have their work published electronically.
Hockey This module is run in conjunction with Hockey Ireland. Students learn the basics of coaching and umpiring. They must give their own time to coach younger students after school. A booklet is completed and assessed by the IHA. On completion students receive a certificate from Hockey Ireland.
Home Economics What will be covered in the module
– Safety and Hygiene in the Kitchen
– Shopping for Food
– A Balanced Diet
– Meal Planning
– Diet and Health: Anaemia, Osteoporosis, Obesity, Diabetes, etc,
– Convenience Foods
– Reading Labels
– Eating Out and Table Etiquette
– Cookery around the World
– Being Physically Active
– Cookery Skills – Practical Cookery Class Every Week
What do you need for this module?
– 1 apron
– 1 lunchbox/container to take food home in
– Display folder
Assessment Ethnic Cookery Assignment
Written Project – 50%
Ethnic Dish – 50%
Introduction to ICT This module has been designed for students with no formal or previous experience in Information Technology. It will provide an introduction to a range of practical skills and underpinning knowledge that will enable students to use computers confidently in their everyday lives.
AIMS
 To familiarise students with the role of computers in their everyday lives
 To introduce students to the essential elements of computer hardware and software
 To provide students with the opportunity to use common computer application packages
 To encourage students to develop good work habits in the use and care of the computer
and equipment
 To stimulate interest and enjoyment in the use of computers.

MODULES
PRESENTATIONS This module will provide the students with an opportunity to learn how to
present information easily and effectively, using transitions, colour, text options, adding music,
videos
WORD PROCESSING From this module students will learn how to create, edit and format a
range of documents using appropriate word-processing techniques.
THE INTERNET This module will enable students to use the Internet as a research and
communication tool. Students will learn to access named web sites, use search engines to
research various topics and use E-mail to send and receive messages. Students will learn to set
up groups, send attachments, save attachments.
GOOGLE FORMS This module will teach students how to prepare surveys, distribute them and
collate and present the results.
SPREADSHEETS This module will develop the skills and knowledge required by the students’
to use spreadsheet software. Students will learn how to create and use spreadsheets and how
to carry out calculations on spreadsheets using appropriate formulae and functions. They will
also learn how to format spreadsheets, replicate formulae, and do basic charts.
BASIC IT TERMINOLOGY This module will help students learn the language and key words
used in ICT so they become more IT savvy. Set up folders, files, manage their Google Drive.
IN THE COMPUTER ROOM
Students will use Google classroom to access weekly assignments. They will work
independently with the support of the class teacher, instruction videos and other students. Each
week students will use Google Classroom to turn in their completed assignments. Students are
encouraged to research people or news items that are interesting to them.
The assignments may relate to a number of modules in any given week.
If a student cannot make the class, they can catch up at home.

Irish Baineann na daltaí an sult as an mbliain seo ag déanamh cur i láthair,tionscnaimh,obair ghrúpa,taighde ar an teanga,cultúr agus oidhreacht na Gaeilge agus filíocht,prós,scannáin agus amhráin.Tagann feabhas iontach ar a muinín.Bíonn turas iontach eagraithe go dtí an Ghaeltacht ag deireadh na bliana.
The students enjoy Irish in transition year doing presentations,projects,group work,research on the Irish language,culture,heritage and tradition and Irish poetry,stories,films and songs.Their confidence in Irish greatly improves.There is a wonderful trip to the Gaeltacht organised at the end of the year
Japanese日本語 In TY Japanese, you will learn HIRAGANA and KANJI, the basis of the Japanese
languages. You will be using a few basic phrases all the way through the module. By
the end of the module, you will know common Japanese phrases and even write
your name in Japanese.
For the cultural part, you will have QUIZZES including traditional & pop culture,
history, literature, geography, music, art and more. There will be a quiz night against
all Irish post primary schools. Usually this will be held in DCU and there will be prizes
and SUSHI tasting. We will also listen and sing some Japanese MUSIC. There will
be a taster of Japanese calligraphy SYODO and Samurai descend sports KENDO
as well. You will be working on some ORIGAMI works too. We also learn Japanese
chopsticks, manners and do competitions with the chopsticks. At the end of the
module, we watch Japanese FILM with English subtitles.
Mathematics As Transition year is non curriculum based, class content is based around 5 main Mathematical Proficiency Objectives.
Conceptual Understanding
Procedural Fluency
Strategic Competence
Strategegic Competence
Adaptive Reasoning
Productive Disposition
The resources available to the Maths department are utilised at the teacher’s discretion to fulfil these objectives in a rounded and engaging manner. Each class period is aimed at being enjoyable, active and productive. Where possible the most tangible and tactile learning methodologies are employed.
Media Studies We live in a media ­saturated world. From video clips on your phone, to TV ads to blockbuster movies, to posters at the bus stop, to the music in your earbuds, you are surrounded by media messages for most of your waking hours. How do you make sense of them all? How do you know what they are trying to communicate — both on an obvious and a less obvious level? How do you know how much you have been influenced — consciously or subconsciously — by these media messages? Does the media reflect your
reality, or control the way you view it?
It’s been said that media literacy is as important to living in the 21st century as regular literacy was to the 20th century. Media Studies helps you develop an important set of skills that will help you increase your knowledge and understanding of:
Communication
Design
Planning
Presentation
Evaluation
Creativity
Critical Thinking
Research
Storytelling
Technology
Politics
Business
Culture
Citizenship
Mentoring The module equips students with the skills to mentor younger students when they are in 5th/6th year. They learn communication skills, assertiveness, problem solving, team work and conflict resolution. These skills are essential as they go out into the world after school.
Mindfulness Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.
While mindfulness is innate, it can becultivated through proven techniques, particularlyseated,walking, standing, andmovingmeditation (it’s also possible lying down but often leads to sleep); short pauses we insert into everyday life; and merging meditation practice with other activities, such asyogaorsports.
When we meditate it doesn’t help to fixate on the benefits, but rather to just do the practice, and yet there are benefits or no one would do it. When we’re mindful, we reduce stress, enhance performance, gain insight and awareness through observing our own mind, and increase our attention to others’ well-being. Throughout this course we will focus on learning about the tradition of mindfulness and on actively practicing mindfulness in our day to day lives.
Mini Company Students will have an opportunity to set up their own business. They will decide on a product or service idea, raise money by selling shares,
be involved in the decision making process and produce, advertise and sell their product. It is suitable for all students whether or not they have studied business beforehand.
Modern Language Trip in TY French and German
In recent years, it has been the tradition that Transition Year students are offered the opportunity to participate in a foreign trip / exchange to either France or Germany. These trips have been very successful and feedback from students has been overwhelmingly positive.
The purpose of offering a language-based trip / exchange in TY;
 Reinforcement of classroom-based learning in an authentic environment
 Encourage students to mature and manage themselves in challenging situations
 A whole new approach to how languages are studied in a more relaxed setting
 Exposure to the culture – Developing a greater awareness and deeper understanding of
the music, cooking, media etc of the country where the target language is spoken
 New friendships amongst peers within the year group and with peers living abroad
 Immersion in the daily life of the country wherethe target language is spoken
Accounting in Mount Temple
Modern Languages in TY In Transition Year, the Modern Language Department focuses on a variety of the following areas:
 Film
 Music
 DELF (French only and depends on numbers interested)
 Fit in Deutsch
 Foreign Trip
 Culture and daily life
 Food
 Reinforcement of some Junior Cycle material
 Develop research skills in areas such as project work and class presentations
 Encourage use of technology for language acquisition
 Discussing work experience and produce a CV in the target language
 Improve oral production skills
 Regular communication with native speakers/correspondents through letters, emails and
social media
Philosophy PHILOSOPHY
In Philosophy (2 periods a week) we cover the great philosophers from Socrates,Plato,Aristotle,Epicurus,Augustine,Aquinas,Descartes,Hume,
Kant,Nietzsche,Marx,Ayer,Sartre,Camus,Kierkegaard,Heidegger.
We look at Philosophy and Science, Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Medical Ethics; how to argue. We use YouTube material on the great ideas, some video material on Nietzsche/Sartre etc. I try to make the ideas contemporary and challenging rather than just a study of dead greybeards.
Physics PHYSICS:
In this short module we work on some important lab skills used by practising scientists through conducting a variety of experiments in the areas of mechanics, heat and optics e.g. taking accurate measurements, graphing skills, calculator skills. Some of the experiments are tasters of experiments done in Leaving Cert Physics which are adapted to suit TYs (less theory, more practice). All experiments include ways of feeding back to students how accurate their measurements and results are, and ways of improving accuracy. If time permits we also cover areas in the history of Science by looking at the lives and work of Aristotle, Galileo, Newton and Einstein.
Spanish SPANISH
An introduction to Spanish language and culture. Common phrases. The basics of spanish grammar. How to communicate in Spain.
Technical Graphics TECHNICAL GRAPHICS / DCG.
This module caters for both beginners and those who have studied Technical Graphics for Junior Cert.
All students are catered for and they will be introduced to the Leaving Cert Design, Communications Graphics course and an introduction to Computer Aided Design using the Solidworks design package.
If you are interested in Architecture, engineering, Graphic design and all other practical courses that involve the design and drawing of projects, this subject is relevant.
Transition Year Career Guidance The Career Guidance module in TY allows students to investigate future careers and college courses which may be of interest to them. The students will complete a number of exercises such as interest and personality inventories. The module largely follows the format in the Reach+ Programme.

The Reach+ College and Preparation Programme encourages students to match their aptitudes, values, interests and personality to career pathways and course opportunities. This programme includes an online learning environment where students can complete and store all of their career research. This module covers the areas of Career Planning, Self Assessment, World of Work, World of Education and a Career Investigation. Students are encouraged to engage in a wide variety of activities and research designed to prepare them for the transition from secondary school to work or college.

Students can also explore the area of Subject Choice which will be important in selecting subjects for 5th Year.

In Transition Year students will sit their Differential Aptitude Tests (DAT) which assess eight important aptitudes : Verbal Reasoning, Numerical Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning, Perceptual Speed and Accuracy, Mechanical Reasoning, Space Relations, Spelling and Language Usage. This series of tests can be useful in highlighting aptitudes linked to various careers and may help students when considering their subjects for the Leaving Certificate.
Students will also have the opportunity to take part in the DCU Transition Year Open Day . This will help students gain an understanding of what university is all about and to get them to start thinking about their future.

A Subject Choice Information Evening will be held for parents/guardians in March 2020 which will outline the subject options available and give general information on this topic.

TY Musical 2019/2020 Dates of the show:Tues 3rd March – Sat 7th March 2020
Name of show: Little Shop of Horrors

Auditions
We will begin our journey in Aug/Sept with the audition process. We will ask all students to read a short piece from the script and to sing a short line from one of the songs. These will be taught to you by the director and musical director. This is something that we expect all students to do. It can be daunting at first, however it is a crucial part of the process.

Rehearsals
Each week there will be timetabled musical classes in the school timetable. Here the group will normally be split between Principals and Cast.
Principals are those with speaking/singing parts. The cast is anyone that will be performing on stage.

Commitment
A high level of commitment is expected by everyone taking part in the show. Your absences will be monitored and if we decide that you have had too many absences you may be asked to leave the process. Please bear this in mind if you are planning extra work experience or trips.

Tickets
All cast and crew will be expected to generate a large portion of the ticket sales. We would ask you and your families to keep ticket sales at the forefront of your mind throughout the months leading up to the show, and encourage people from all aspects of your life to buy a ticket and come to see your fantastic show!!

The Show
The music and the characters in Little Shop of Horrors make for a very exciting and funny show that will have audiences on the edge of their seats. With a live orchestra, it will have audiences bopping in their seats and by the end of the show, we expect they will be jumping out of their seats to join in the fun. The show is narrated by three street urchins, Crystal, Chiffon and Ronnette, who are collectively known as the Ronnettes. They are the only ones who have an insight into what’s going on in Mushnik’s Skid Row Florists and they let the audience in on the secret through their own special brand of attitude and sass. There are plenty of exciting roles for the cast to assume.
The props for this year’s show will be unlike anything Mount Temple audiences have seen from the musical before. Little Shop of Horrors involves a large element of stage production, as we must negotiate some strange and unusual props, so backstage crew will also have a huge role to fill.

Woodcrafts and Furniture WOODCRAFTS AND FURNITURE: Design and construct furniture.
Design and make items for the musical.
Produce/ recycle items of furniture for sale at the Autumn fair .
Woodwork Woodwork in TY gives students an opportunity to design and construct a project using traditional woodwork skills.
They may be asked also to help with the construction of the set for the musical
Youth Action Project YAP is a year long module which is based around a set of international goals called the SDGs or Sustainable Development Goals. In this course we learn all about how these goals came about and how we can play our part to help achieve them. The goals are all to do with making the world a better, more sustainable place to live. Each student selects, researches and presents on a topic they are passionate about that links to the SDGs. As a class we vote on which topic to focus our efforts on and work to create change in that area. Topics presented this year included; Direct Provision, Conflict in Syria, The Homeless Crisis, HIV, Climate Action, Save the Bees, Gender Equality etc.
As part of our local action throughout the year we also volunteered in either the CRC Central Remedial Clinic or Childvision. Here we volunteer as swimming and classroom assistants, stable hands or we assist in Equine Therapy. We work as a stable hand and led horses in the OT sessions.

Malahide Road, Clontarf, Dublin 3, Ireland. Email: info@mounttemple.ie | Telephone: +353-1-833-6984

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